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JAMA Clinical Reviews

Interviews about ideas & innovations in medicine, science & clinical practice. Listen & earn CME credit
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Now displaying: July, 2020

In-depth interviews about current ideas and innovation in medicine, science, and clinical practice.

Jul 27, 2020

Accumulating evidence in adults has shown that nonoperative treatment of appendicitis is an acceptable means for treatment. A recent prospective study published in JAMA has shown the same is true for children. Most children who are treated with antibiotics instead of surgery for appendicitis do just fine. The lead author for this study, Peter Minneci, MD, from the Nationwide Children’s Hospital of the Ohio State Medical School, discusses his work in investigating alternative ways to treat appendicitis.

Related Article:

Association of Nonoperative Management Using Antibiotic Therapy vs Laparoscopic Appendectomy With Treatment Success and Disability Days in Children With Uncomplicated Appendicitis

Jul 21, 2020

Jeffrey Berger, MD, from the Center for the Prevention of Cardiovascular Disease at the New York University School of Medicine, explains the ins and outs of perioperative cardiovascular risk assessment and management for noncardiac surgery.

Related Article(s):

Perioperative Cardiovascular Risk Assessment and Management for Noncardiac Surgery

Jul 21, 2020

Some of the nearly 40 000 deaths each year in the US from breast cancer might be avoided through use of medications to prevent breast cancer in high-risk women. Patricia Ganz, MD, Distinguished Professor of Medicine and Public Health at UCLA, reviews the evidence underlying chemoprevention of breast cancer and which women might benefit from the drugs.

Related Article(s):

Medications for Primary Prevention of Breast Cancer

Breast Cancer Risk Calculators:

https://bcrisktool.cancer.gov/calculator.html
https://tools.bcsc-scc.org/BC5yearRisk/intro.htm
https://ibis.ikonopedia.com/

 

Jul 20, 2020

Both remdesivir and dexamethasone have been promoted as effective treatments for COVID-19. JAMA Deputy Editor Greg Curfman, MD, and Professor Rachel Sachs, JD, from the Washington University School of Law discuss the science and health policy aspects of these COVID-19 treatments.

Related Article(s):

Missed Opportunities on Emergency Remdesivir Use

Jul 13, 2020

Whether the SARS-CoV-2 virus is transmitted by droplets or aerosol influences which public health interventions might slow its spread. Michael Klompas, MD, professor of medicine at Harvard Medical School, explains evidence to date about mechanisms of coronavirus transmission and implications for pandemic containment and mitigation efforts.

Related:

Airborne Transmission of SARS-CoV-2: Theoretical Considerations and Available Evidence

Jul 10, 2020

SSRIs are a commonly used medication. Although complications from them are not common because so many people take these medications, physicians will inevitably see problems such as dependence and withdrawal, hyponatremia, bleeding disorders, and even the uncommon but severe SSRI syndrome. To learn about these potential complications, we spoke with David Juurlink, MD, PhD, an internist and clinical pharmacologist at the University of Toronto.

Jul 8, 2020

Proton pump inhibitors are among the most commonly used medicines by patients. They’re generally safe, but they can cause acute kidney injury, and it’s important for clinicians to be aware of this potential complication. David Juurlink, MD, PhD, internist and clinical pharmacologist from the University of Toronto, discusses this important potential complication.

Related Article: 

An Evidence-Based Approach to the Treatment of Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease

Jul 7, 2020

Although there are only about 4000 new cases of amyloidosis in the US per year, it can cause preserved ejection fraction heart failure, kidney and liver failure, and neuropathy. Amyloidosis is easily diagnosed and treatable, and it should be considered in the differential diagnosis for these diseases. Morie A. Gertz, MD, from the Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minnesota, talks with JAMA Clinical Reviews about amyloidosis.

Related:

Systemic Amyloidosis Recognition, Prognosis, and Therapy

Jul 6, 2020

Although frequently reported, penicillin allergy is actually uncommon. Penicillins are very effective against a wide variety of infections, and when they can't be used, problems arise. We discussed the problem of penicillin allergy with David Juurlink, MD, PhD, internist and clinical pharmacologist from the University of Toronto.

Related Article(s):

Evaluation and Management of Penicillin Allergy

Jul 2, 2020

One of the most common causes for problems we see in manuscripts at JAMA is an inappropriately calculated study sample size. This seemingly mysterious process is explained by Lynne Stokes, PhD, professor of Statistical Science at Southern Methodist University in Dallas, Texas.

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